Fall 2020 On-line & Hybrid Courses Supported by IGI and CEAPS

Date

08/21/20

The Illinois Global Institute recently announced a grant initiative that supported course development across the Urbana campus. A total of 33 courses in 22 departments across 6 colleges and schools have been developed as on-line or hybrid classes. These classes focus on global learning and are intended to bridge and connect students to our world through creative pedagogies and new methods and materials.

CEAPS participated in this initiative and funded the following courses with support from our Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center grant:

  • ANTH 499 – Anthropology of Policing
    Jeffrey T. Martin
    Introduction to the study of policing, using anthropological theories and methods. Includes a comparative historical survey of the diverse forms of power and authority which have been bundled into modern ideas of police, considers a range of authors contributing to contemporary debates about policing in anthropology, and supports student research on both theoretical and engaged topics. This semester’s focal topic will be a comparative study of policing in the People’s Republic of China and the United States of America. Against the backdrop of the very different ways these two countries utilized their police powers in response to the novel Coronavirus pandemic, we will explore the deeper meaning of “policing” in light of the contrast between China’s historical experience with revolutionary policing, and the aspirational idea of “police abolition” which has recently emerged from America’s ostensibly liberal tradition of governance.
     
  • CHIN 201 – Elementary Chinese I
    Chilin Shih
    Introduction to Mandarin Chinese, including basic skills in speaking, reading, and writing. Not open to students with a background in Chinese language.

     
  • EALC 250 – Introduction to Japanese Culture
    Christopher Thane Callahan
    This course is an historical and topical introduction to Japanese Culture, which begins by examining the sources of Japanese culture and identity in the ancient past and then traces the development of Japanese culture through history up to present day Japanese society. Although it is common to regard “Japan” as a homogenous society and “Japanese culture” as a monolithic and unchanging whole, our approach will demonstrate the heterogeneous, dynamic and ever-changing complexity of Japanese culture and society, mindful of the varying ways both Japanese and others have defined and re-defined who “the Japanese” are and what their culture was and is.

     
  • EALC 398-D – Yellow Peril Redux: From Coolies to Communism, Trade Wars and Coronavirus
    Dan Shao
    This undergraduate seminar bridges the disciplinary gap between cultural, economic and political studies of U.S.-East Asian interactions. It aims to introduce to students an interdisciplinary study of the historical roots and cultural idioms beneath the contemporary economic and political debates concerning the “Trade Wars” and the pandemic caused by coronavirus, beneath the broader popular rhetoric and political policies that deeply impacts people’s daily life and contributes to the divisive acrimony in U.S.-East Asian relations. Students will study Yellow Peril across the demarcation between humanities, economics, law and business, and between theoretical and empirical research. Students will be trained to examine primary sources from a variety of genres, including legal cases, news reports, films, political cartoons and governmental documents from the late 19th century to the present. Topics to be covered include Origins of Yellow Peril, Vincent Chin and Japanese Cars, Industrial/Corporate Espionage and Law, Politicians on Trade War, Science and National Interests, The Japan / China that Can Say No, Coronavirus and Yellow Peril Redux. Our interdisciplinary approach and transnational topics will help to translate academic research to classroom teaching and address real-life concerns faced by people from various walks of life in this era of community reconstruction via cross-border cultural and economic confrontation, controversies, communications and conversations.
     
  • EALC/CWL 275 – Masterpieces of East Asian Literatures
    Jingling Chen
    What do holy monks, star-crossed lovers, and shapeshifting monsters have in common? In this course, we will read some of the great classics of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese literature, and explore the rich socio-cultural contexts behind these works. You will gain a finer appreciation of these cultures and hone your critical skills. Works covered include The Tale of the Genji, The Journey to the West, and The Story of the Stone, and some most famous poems from the area.
  • HIST/EALC 120 – East Asian Civilizations
    Roderick Wilson
    This course provides a survey of the past four centuries of East Asian history from the political and economic heights of the Qing Empire in China, the Choson dynasty in Korea, and the Tokugawa shogunate in Japan through the turbulent decades of imperialism, colonialism, nationalism, and industrialization to the region’s resurgence in the 1980s and 1990s. To help make sense of this long history, the course is subdivided into the following four chronological units: Era of Growth and Stability; the Nineteenth-Century Transformation; Alternate Modernities; and East Asia since 1945. Across these four periods, you will encounter a variety of historical sources that introduce you to all manner of people - the high, the low, women, men, outcastes, foreigners, and ethnic minorities. The sum of these voices and experiences should provide you with a broad understanding of people’s experiences in early modern and modern East Asia.
     
  • JAPN 203 – Intermediate Japanese I
    Misumi Sadler
    Students practice conversational skills at an intermediate level within a variety of everyday practical situations. For example, they give directions on certain things, and describe their future plans and what has to be done to accomplish their goals. Their reading and writing skills are expanded at a discourse level. They learn how to use transitional devices and a variety of clause connective devices to read/write longer texts as well as how to write functional materials including directions, thank you letters, Japanese resume.
     
  • JAPN 305 – Advanced Japanese I
    Misumi Sadler
    JAPN 305 is specifically for students who have successfully completed 250~300 instruction hours of Japanese study. The course solidifies the grammar, vocabulary and kanji foundation built during students’ study at the beginning level, and expands their four language skills (i.e. listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and the socio-cultural knowledge they need for communication.
     
  • KOR 201 – Elementary Korean I
    Jeeyoung Ahn Ha
    FA 2020 KOR 201 will be taught as remote instruction and require students to meet synchronously for 50 minutes on MTWRF. This course will provide a communicative learning environment through Zoom, Moodle, Google Doc, Padlet, Quizlet, and Flipgrid. Students will be asked to turn on their cameras during class meetings and upload digital images and videos of their works as well. Before each class, students are required to study the vocabulary through online activities, read the textbook, and watch a short lecture slide, as class time is assigned to real-life based practices and communicative activities, where students will practice reading, listening, speaking and writing through tasks.

    The course starts from the Korean Alphabet (Hangul), and students will learn basic vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structures as well as commonly used expressions. Each lesson is situation or topic-based and consists of model dialogues, narration, and oral and written wrap-up tasks. Topics include daily activities and personal environment such as campus life, classes, daily routines, hobbies, etc. Students will be expected to engage in vocabulary-building, target structure-focused, and simple, routine conversational tasks in various formats and learn to use culturally appropriate expressions for familiar settings.
     
  • KOR 221 – Korean Reading and Writing I
    Jeeyoung Ahn Ha
    FA 2020 KOR 221 will be taught as remote instruction and require students to meet synchronously for 50 minutes on MTWR. This course will provide a communicative learning environment through Zoom, Moodle, Google Doc, Padlet, Quizlet, and Flipgrid. Students will be asked to turn on their cameras during class meetings and upload digital images and videos of their works as well. Before each class, students are required to study the vocabulary through online activities and read the textbook, as class time is assigned to real-life based practices and communicative activities, where students will practice reading, listening, speaking and writing through tasks.

    This course is designed to help students achieve Novice high or Intermediate Low level of proficiency in the Korean language. Students will learn basic vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structures as well as commonly used expressions. Each lesson is situation or topic-based and consists of a model conversation, narration, reading, and oral and written wrap-up tasks that will expose students to Korean culture and help them acquire intercultural competence as well. Topics include daily activities and personal environment such as introduction, family and friends, campus life, hobbies, etc. Students will be engaged in vocabulary-building and target structure-focused class activities and tasks in various formats that they can utilize in real life contexts. At the course completion, students should be comfortable in simple communication on familiar topics.
     
  • UP 246 – International Environmental Planning and Governance
    Sean Kennedy
    Examines the environmental pressures affecting and created by cities and urbanization in the global South. Students will learn about the historical and contemporary drivers of environmental change and the potential implications of new planning approaches to current and future environmental challenges. Activities include interactive class discussions, small group exercises, and a team-based project in which students design collaborative planning interventions to address specific environmental issues in an international city of their choice.

 

The Illinois Global Institute is comprised of ten area and global studies centers and thematic programs: Center for African Studies; Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies; Center for Global Studies; Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies; Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies; European Union Center; The Lemann Center for Brazilian Studies; Program in Arms Control and Domestic and International Security; Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center; Women and Gender in Global Perspectives. Click here to view the full list of courses funded under the IGI Online and Hybrid Course Initiative.